Lusławice

[ A+ ] /[ A- ]

Lusławice

Lusławice is by no definition an ordinary place. The didactic and artistic seed has been planted here at the end of the 16th century when an Italian thinker and philosopher and one of the most influential figures of the Reformation, Faustus Socyn settled in the area in 1598. Thanks to his doctrine the Polish Brethren, who had its headquarters in Lusławice, became an institution attracting all the greatest humanists of the time  to the region. Wacław Potocki, a poet who belonged to the Polish Brethren described Luslawice as ‘the heavenly Jerusalem’ where ‘the cultural matters were treated with depth and consideration’. Following the model of the contemporary academies, the School of Lusławice offered classes in theology, metaphysics, logic, dialectic, anatomy, and physics. Next to singing psalms and sacred songs, students were also trained in debate on religious matters.

The artistic tradition of Lusławice survived and continued throughout the 20th century. Jacek Malczewski, a painter from the Young Poland movement moved in to an 18th century manor in Lusławice and established a school of fine arts for the talented village children. After the Second World War the estate fell into ruin. Brought back to its greatness by Krzysztof Penderecki, the refurbished manor surrounded by a 5-hectar park and arboretum have become the composer’s home and workplace. As the result, Lusławice has been revived as the place of attraction for Polish and foreign artists. Soon after, professor Penderecki envisioned the opening of a European Centre for Music in Lusławice whose primary purpose is to train particularly talented young musicians from all over Europe and beyond. In 2013 the Centre has opened its doors and became the hub for performing arts and music education in the area and far beyond. The building itself, despite its modern appearance, was designed to exist in harmony with the surrounding landscape. The materials used in construction were timber and sand stone, with a light glazed structure enclosed by wooden colonnade.

 

Comments are closed.